Tag Archives: 1980s

Sewing to the 80s

I’ve taken a mini break from crocheting to work on this dress that I’m planning on wearing to a work party. Yay! I haven’t sewn a dress from scratch in… er… well over a year. That is not good! This past weekend I went fabric shopping with a friend and found this fabulous mustard fabric that totally works for a vintage pattern that I bought at a vintage expo a few years ago. It’s a super cute 1960′s buttoned dress. I’ll post more photos when it’s complete! For now, you get this teaser photo.

As much as I love crocheting in front of the TV, I really do love sewing and listening to The Cure station on Pandora. Serious ear candy… Depeche Mode, Smashing Pumpkins, and my beloved New Order. Music is so inspiring, but I probably didn’t need to tell you that.

Notebook on Cities and Clothes

yamamoto

I watched this documentary last night called Notebook on Cities and Clothes. It’s a film about Japanese fashion designer Yohji Yamamoto directed and filmed by Wim Wenders.

Notebook on Cities and Clothes is a slow paced, relaxed look at an industry that often moves at a mile a minute. Filmed in 35mm, Wenders helps audiences see through the window of this man’s world. We get a lot of one on one time with Yamamoto. We see what inspires him, and are privy to his idea of what he does. He is not a fashion designer. That is not his goal. His inspiration comes from photos from the 19th century working class and the garments they had to wear to live their lives. He is the opposite of what his native Tokyo seems to promote: excessive consumption. He explains that Tokyo encourages over-consumption. Buy everything, be more fulfilled. He shares that his worst nightmare would be to design clothing that people cannot wear and function in on a day to day basis. Yamamoto is a quiet, yet mesmerizing man.

yamamoto2009

A few pieces from his A/W 09/10 collection. (Photo Credit)

The film as a whole was not as exciting as some of the other fashion documentaries I have seen. At times it was quite boring. But I think that is what makes it stand out from other depictions of the “fashion” world. In a way, Wenders was able to tell the story of an artist and philosopher than that of a fashion designer.

“Everything I buy is vintage and smells funny. Maybe that’s why I don’t have a boyfriend.”

fabricPintucksew Vintage Fabric

I stumbled upon that Lucy Liu quote online today and couldn’t stop laughing. Well, maybe I’m exaggerating. It was more of a snicker, and it was quite short.

Anyway! Happy Friday guys and dolls. As I sit here sipping my Ice Blended White Mocha beverage, I can’t help but be thankful to be indoors today. It has been around 100 degrees everyday this week. Too hot to handle, fo sho.

My lovely Aunt who lives in the beautiful city of Pasadena emailed me with this neat blog to check out today:

pintuckblog

They have two etsy shops: one that sells vintage fabric (pintucksew), and one that sells apparel (pintuckstyle). I was already planning a thrifting adventure tomorrow, so looking through their shop is definitely inspiring my wish list.

pintuckstyledress

Pintuckstyle 1940s-Inspired 1980s Vintage Dress

I absolutely love the fabric that you see at the beginning of this entry. I wish they had more than half a yard. Wouldn’t that be adorable as a short, elastic banded skirt? I wonder if you’re getting the same visual as I am, and if you are, isn’t it cute!? Haha. Also, this dress is great, but would look ridiculous on me, as I have broader shoulders. But I love it anyway.  I would probably remove the sleeves.

That’s all for now. Keep cool out there, kittens!

Sometimes Size Does Not Matter

I’ve been wanting to see this show ever since I found out it was going to be at San Diego State. I missed that boat, but luckily for me, the show was also traveling to good ole’ Cal State Los Angeles. I’ve never been to Cal State LA, and I must say, their Luckman Arts complex is gorgeous. Me gusta mucho. I love how accessible it is from the parking structure, and how easy it is to find from the freeway. Two thumbs up from a tourist’s perspective. (Everytime I go to LA I feel like a tourist). So anyway, going on as we speak…

The Graphic Imperative: International Posters for Peace, Social Justice & the Environment, 1965-2005
Libertidad Para Angela Davis, Beltran Felix, 1971

Where?
Cal State Los Angeles
Luckman Gallery
5151 State University Dr.
Los Angeles, CA 90032-8116
(323) 343-6604

When?
October 27-December 15, 2007
Gallery Hours: Mon-Thurs. and Sat. 12-5pm

How much?
FREE, except for the dollar that you’ll pay for parking… which is a bargain for parking in LA.

I STILL don’t get it.
What initially drew me to this exhibit? Two words: Guerilla Girls! I love seeing their pieces at different exhibits. They’re so inspiring, I would never pass up an opportunity to experience their work up close. The aura of powerful women is always palpable. I know their pieces are posters, and it’s not exactly the same as viewing a painting, because it’s not one of a kind… but I think that’s what’s so great about this exhibit, and about the graphic arts in general. Graphic art, for me, has so much cultural influence and resonates loudly irregardless of which form it takes; whether it’s a billboard, graffiti, a sticker, or in this case, a poster. It’s a piece of art that is utilized in the mainstream of everyday and in turn may be discussed outside of the political arena, making these issues everyone’s problem instead of just the government’s. It’s kind of sneaky if you think about it. We are advertising a social movement like we’re advertising a consumer good. If you capture someone’s attention, the product becomes more popular, and then more people will jump on the bandwagon. Well, that’s in the utopia for social movements in my mind, but I guess in the real world it’s a little more difficult.

The Graphic Imperative exhibits 111 posters that have served to create awareness of social issues or injustices that existed, and in turn created a discourse to try to make change happen. The exhibit includes posters from the past 40 years; four decades that were critical to many issues such as unfair labor, racism, violence against women, AIDS, the environment, and many more.

The Luckman Art Gallery at CSLA is pretty small space, but an average size for a University art gallery. Although the exhibit is small its message is anything but.